Friday, January 13, 2012

Oh, mama - how do I get me one of these?

Because I don't spend quite enough time online.

Lumus, an Israeli company, specialises in what it calls Light-guide Optical Element (LOE) technology... It's latest product is the PD-18-2, which may look to the untrained eye like a cumbersome pair of sunglasses.

But inside the lenses of the glasses, the user can see high-quality full colour images.

...Products like this are already on the market for professional and military use, but where the next-generation PD-18-2 differs is that users can see though the spectacles too, instead of having the images block their vision.

The translucent lenses allow for what the manufacturer calls 'augmented vision', overlaying images or graphics over your usual field of vision.

They are designed for professionals such as pilots, surgeons and soldiers but there are hopes that it can be adapted for the consumer market so people could watch film or TV on the move, or play video games as they walk around.

...the possibility of a move into the consumer market has already brought mixed reactions from technology watchers.

It could be extremely useful as a portable GPS system, but there are concerns that it could be distracting for pedestrians who can often be seen walking round with their heads buried in mobile phones.

What??? This is an awesome innovation!

'Cause when I think of "augmented vision", I can't help but recall those "X-Ray Specs" that were advertised in the comic books of my youth.

Because I'm mature like that.


Hat tip: Drudge Report.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Japanese have already started to think about the implications of this technology thru an animated TV series called Denno Coil a few years ago. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denn%C5%8D_Coil

Proof said...

A personal "heads up" display? Sweet!

Phil said...

"...so people could watch film or TV on the move, or play video games as they walk around."
Let me edit that for you:
"so people could watch film or TV on the move, or play video games as they drive."